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Memorials:
John Milton Ward
Reinhold Brinkmann
Leon Kirchner

James Yannatos

Rulan Pian


Music Department office:
phone: 617-495-2791
fax: 617-496-8081
email: musicdpt@fas.harvard.edu

 



People

 


Faculty

Carolyn ABBATE
Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor
cabbate@fas.harvard.edu

Music Building PH 8
617-496-6527
Richard BEAUDOIN Preceptor on Music
beaudoin@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G 2
617-494-7737
website: www.richardbeaudoin.com
Andrew CLARK Senior Lecturer on Music, Director of Choral Music at Harvard
agclark@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G 7
617-495-8827
Suzannah CLARK. Professor of Music
Theory
sclark@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G 6
617-495-4009
Federico CORTESE Senior Lecturer on Music, Conductor of the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra
fcortese@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G 5
617-495-1533
Chaya CZERNOWIN. Walter Bigelow Rosen Professor of Music; Graduate Advisor in Composition
Composition
chayaczernowin@gmail.com
Music Building 308 N
617-495-3647
Christopher HASTY Walter W. Naumburg Professor of Music
Theory (on leave spring 2014)
hasty@fas.harvard.edu
Music Buildling PHl 3
617-495-2692
Vijay IYER Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts
vijayiyer@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building
617-496-4304
Jill JOHNSON Dance Director, Office for the Arts at Harvard, Dance Program
Senior Lecturer, Department of Music
johnson@fas.harvard.edu
Harvard Dance Center
60 Garden Street, Cambridge
617-495-8683
Thomas Forrest KELLY. Morton B. Knafel Professor of Music; Head Tutor
Historical Musicology
tkelly@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 203 S
617-495-2791
Robert D. LEVIN. Dwight P. Robinson, Jr. Professor of Music
Performance & Analysis (on leave 2013-2014)
rlevin@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building PH 1
617-495-2791
Ingrid MONSON Quincy Jones Professor of African American Music, supported by the Time Warner Endowment
Ethnomusicology, Musicology
imonson@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 202 S
617-494-7740
Osnat NETZER

Preceptor in Music
netzer@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 307 N
617-495-1531

Carol J. OJA William Powell Mason Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
coja@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 304 S
617-495-3971
Alexander REHDING. Fanny Peabody Professor of Music; Chair
Theory
arehding[at]fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 305 N (Professorial: 496-6646)
Music Building 104 S (Chair's office: 617-495-9854 )
Department Reception: 617-495-2791
Sindhumathi REVULURI. Associate Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
revuluri@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 302 S
617-496-9317
Kay Kaufman SHELEMAY G. Gordon Watts Professor of Music
Professor of African and African American Studies
Ethnomusicology
shelemay@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building PH 7
617-495-4008
Anne C. SHREFFLER James Edward Ditson Professor of Music
Affiliate, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Historical Musicology
acshreff@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 301S
617-494-7742
Daniel STEPNER.. Preceptor in Music
Performance: Chamber Music
stepner@brandeis.edu
Music Building PH 1
617-495-2791
Hans TUTSCHKU. Fanny P. Mason Professor of Music, Director of the Harvard University Studio for Electroacoustic Composition (HUSEAC)
Composition
tutschku@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G-3
617-495-2314
Kate VAN ORDEN Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
vanorden@fas.harvard.edu
Music Bulidling 204S
495-3198
Richard K. WOLF Professor of Music
Ethnomusicology
rwolf@fas.harvard.edu
031 Memorial Hall (office location only/mailing address is Music Building)
Postal address: Music Building / Harvard University / Cambridge, MA 02138
617-494-7678


 

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Faculty at a Glance


Carolyn Abbate
Professor of Music
cabbate@fas.harvard.edu

Music Building 8
617-495-3529

Carolyn Abbate’s work centers on opera history, music and philosophy, ephemeral art, and on film and sound studies. Her writings have been translated into several languages, and she herself is a translator (most recently, of Vladimir Jankélévitch’s La musique et l’ineffable). Current research projects include: operetta and ethical frivolity; the transition to early sound film, and its technologies as a “vernacular philosophy” of sounding animation and rendered symbol.



Abbate faculty page


   

Richard Beaudoin
Preceptor on Music
beaudoin@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G-2
617-494-7737

Richard Beaudoin's music has been commissioned and performed widely in Europe and America. His recent compositions involve micro-temporal measurements of recorded performances. His research fields include musical resemblance and time.


website: www.richardbeaudoin.com


 

   

Andrew Clark
Senior Lecturer on Music, Director of Choral Music at Harvard
agclark@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G-7
617-495-8827

Clark serves as Director of Choral Activities and Senior Lecturer on Music. He is the Music Director of the Harvard Glee Club, the Radcliffe Choral Society, and the Harvard-Radcliffe Collegium Musicum and teaches courses in conducting and music theory. He leads the Holden Choruses in performances throughout Europe and the United States, in studio recordings, and collaborations with distinguished conductors, composers, and ensembles. His choirs have been hailed as “first rate” (Boston Globe), “cohesive and exciting” (Opera News), and “beautifully blended” (Providence Journal), achieving performances of “passion, conviction, adrenalin, [and] coherence” (Worcester Telegram). Prior to his appointment at Harvard, Clark was Artistic Director of the Providence Singers and Director of Choral Activities at Tufts University for seven years. Clark has performed prominent venues including Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center and Boston’s Symphony Hall. He has collaborated with the Pittsburgh and New Haven Symphonies, the Rhode Island and Boston Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops, Stephen Sondheim, Sweet Honey in the Rock, the Trinity Wall Street Choir, the Kronos Quartet, and the Dave Brubeck Quartet.

Clark faculty page



 

 

 

sclark

Suzannah Clark
Professor of Music
Theory
sclark@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G-6
617-495-4009

Suzannah Clark specializes in the music of Franz Schubert, the history of music theory, and medieval music. Her book Analyzing Schubert was published by Cambridge University Press in 2011. She co-edited Music Theory and Natural Order from the Renaissance to the Early Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2001; pbk 2005) with Alexander Rehding, and co-edited Citation and Authority in Medieval and Renaissance Musical Culture: Learning from the Learned (Boydell & Brewer, 2005) with Elizabeth Eva Leach. She is currently working on a book, Quirks in Tonality: Aspects in the History of Tonal Space, which focuses on major issues in the history of tonal theory, such as changing conceptions of modulation, changing perceptions of key relations, constructions of diatonicism versus chromaticism, and even why theorists like to draw musical diagrams of what has come to be known as “tonal space.”

Clark faculty page


 

 

 

 

fcortese

Federico Cortese
Senior Lecturer on Music, Conductor of the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra
fcortese@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G-5
617-495-1533

Federico Cortese has served as Music Director of the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras since 1999 and in the same capacity for the New England String Ensemble since 2005. He has conducted operatic and symphonic engagements throughout the United States, Australia, Asia and Europe.  

Cortese faculty page




 

 

 

cczernowin


chayaczernowin.com

Chaya Czernowin
Walter Bigelow Rosen Professor of Music; Graduate Advisor in Composition
Composition
chayaczernowin@gmail.com
Music Building 308N
617-495-3647

Czernowin’s chamber and orchestral music has been played at more than forty festivals all over the world and include commissions by major ensembles, orchestras, and festivals. Characteristic of her work are attempts to find alternative temporalities, changing perspectives and scale, fragmentation, examination, and stretching of identity; all coupled with a strong physical imprint and high emotional intensity.

Czernowin faculty page




 

 

 

chasty

Christopher Hasty
Walter W. Naumburg Professor of Musi; Graduate Advisor in Theory (fall 2013)

Theory (on leave spring 2014)
hasty@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 3
617-495-2692

Professor Hasty’s scholarly work engages problems in the theory and analysis of music from the 16th to the 20th centuries from the standpoint of process and experience. His book, Meter as Rhythm (1997) won the Wallace Berry Award from the Society for Music Theory  His current research interests include process philosophy, poetic prosody, and ecological and post-cognitivist psychology. 


Hasty faculty page


 

 

 

 

Vijay Iyer
Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts
vijayiyer@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building
617-496-4304

Grammy-nominated composer-pianist Vijay Iyer's career has spanned the sciences, the humanities and the arts. He has published in Journal of Consciousness Studies, Wire, Music Perception, JazzTimes, Journal of the Society for American Music, Critical Studies in Improvisation, in the anthologies Arcana IV, Sound Unbound, Uptown Conversation, The Best Writing on Mathematics: 2010, and in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Critical Improvisation Studies. Iyer has taught at Manhattan School of Music, New York University, and the New School, and he is the Director of The Banff Centre’s International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music, an annual 3-week program in Alberta, Canada founded by Oscar Peterson. Iyer recently finished a multi-year residency with San Francisco Performances, performing and working with schools and community organizations. His most recent honors include a 2013 MacArthur fellowship. Iyer was appointed the Franklin D. and Florence Rosenblatt Professor of the Arts in January 2014.



Iyer faculty page


 

Jill Johnson
Dance Director, Office for the Arts at Harvard, Dance Program
Senior Lecturer, Department of Music
johnson@fas.harvard.edu
Harvard Dance Center
60 Garden Street, Cambridge
617-495-8683

Ms. Johnson is an innovative and accomplished dancer, choreographer, educator and producer. A 26-year veteran of the dance field, she has appeared in over 50 tours and taught for dance companies and colleges on five continents. An honors graduate of the National Ballet School, she was a soloist with The National Ballet of Canada and principal dancer and researcher with Ballet Frankfurt. A protégé and 22-year close collaborator of choreographer William Forsythe, she stages and produces Forsythe's ballets on companies worldwide, including The Norwegian National Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet, Alterballetto, Netherlands Dans Theater, Batsheva Dance Company, The National Ballet of Canada, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Boston Ballet, La Scala, and American Ballet Theatre.

Johnson faculty page


[Photo by Alicia Anstead/Harvard Office for the Arts]

 

 

 

tkelly

Thomas Forrest Kelly
Morton B. Knafel Professor of Music; Head Tutor
Historical Musicology
tkelly@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 203 S
617-495-2791

Professor Kelly's main fields of interest are chant and performance practice.

Kelly faculty page


 

 

 

 

rlevin

Robert Levin
Dwight P. Robinson, Jr. Professor of Music
Performance & Analysis (on leave 2013-2014)
rlevin@fas.harvard.edu
617-496-6527

Robert Levin has performed throughout the United States, Europe, Australia and Asia, appearing with the orchestras of Atlanta, Berlin, Birmingham, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles, Montreal, Philadelphia, Toronto, Utah and Vienna on the Steinway and with the Academy of Ancient Music, the English Baroque Soloists, the Handel & Haydn Society, the London Classical Players, the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, and Philharmonia Baroque on period pianos. Renowned for his improvised cadenzas in Classical period repertoire, Levin has made recordings of a wide range of repertoire for DG Archiv, Decca/London, Deutsche Harmonia Mundi, ECM, Hänssler, Klavier Festival Ruhr, New York Philomusica, Philips and SONY Classical.  His recordings include Bach’s complete keyboard concertos, the six English Suites and both books of the Well-Tempered Clavier (Hänssler Edition Bachakademie); a Mozart concerto cycle with Chris­topher Hogwood and the Academy of Ancient Music for Decca/Oiseau Lyre; the Beethoven concertos with Sir John Eliot Gardiner and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Roman­tique for DG Archiv; and the complete piano music of Dutilleux for ECM. A passionate advocate of new music, Robert Levin has commissioned and premiered a large number of works, including Joshua Fineberg’s Veils (2001), John Harbison’s Second Sonata (2003), Yehudi Wyner’s piano concerto Chiavi in mano (Pulitzer Prize, 2006), Bernard Rands’ Preludes (2007), Thomas Oboe Lee’s Piano Concerto (2007), and Hans Peter Türk’s Träume (2012).

Robert Levin appears frequently with his wife, pianist Ya-Fei Chuang, in duo recitals and with orchestra, and with violist Kim Kashkashian. A noted Mozart scholar, Mr. Levin’s completions of Mozart’s Requiem and other unfinished works have been recorded and performed throughout the world. In 2005 his completion of the Mozart C-minor Mass, commissioned by Carnegie Hall, was premiered there and has since been widely heard in the United States and Europe. After more than a quarter century as an artist teacher at the Sarasota Music Festival he succeeded Paul Wolfe as Artistic Director in 2007. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Akademie für Mozartforschung, he is President of the International Johann Sebastian Bach Competition (Leipzig, Germany).



Levin faculty page




 

 

 

Ingrid Monson
Quincy Jones Professor of African American Music, supported by the Time Warner Endowment
Ethnomusicology, Musicology
imonson@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 202 S
617-494-7740

Professor Monson won the Sonneck Society's 1998 Irving Lowens Prize for the best book in American music for her 1996 Saying Something, Jazz Improvisation and Interaction. She has recently written on the impact of the Civil Rights Movement and African Independence on the history of jazz, and is working on a book on the musics of the African Diaspora. Monson was a founding member of the Klezmer Conservatory Band.

Monson faculty page




 

 

 

Osnat Netzer
Preceptor in Music
netzer@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 307 N
617-495-1531 s

Osnat Netzer is a composer, pianist and educator based in Boston. She was born in Haifa, Israel and studied at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance, Mannes College of Music and New England Conservatory, where she completed her doctorate in composition in 2011. In 2009-10 she researched experimental theater in Berlin with the support of a fellowship from the Frank Huntington Beebe Foundation. While in Berlin, she composed her opera The Wondrous Woman Within, an adaptation of the play by Hanoch Levin. The first scene of this opera was performed on New York City Opera’s VOX 2012 and received critical acclaim from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. The complete opera will receive its world premiere this season in a production that will travel to both Tel Aviv and Jerusalem thanks to a substantial grant from the Israeli Lottery Council for the Arts. Her works have been performed at Tanglewood, June in Buffalo and the Bowdoin Music Festival and in countries including Germany, France, the Netherlands, Israel and South Korea. Recent honors include recognition from the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards and winning of the Boston Modern Orchestra Project Competition, the Zeltsman Marimba Competition and the Donald Martino Award for Excellence in Composition. Dr. Netzer is also active as a pianist in classical and contemporary concert music, as well as improvisatory folk, klezmer, and jazz-influenced works. She joins the Harvard faculty after serving on the faculty of New England Conservatory for five years.


 

 

 

 

 

Carol Oja
William Powell Mason Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
coja@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 304 S
617-495-3971

Oja's research focuses on 20th- and 21st-century American musical traditions, often in transnational contexts. She has written extensively about modernist composers (Aaron Copland, Henry Cowell, Ruth Crawford, William Grant Still, and Edgard Varèse), cross-cultural composition (Colin McPhee), and high-low intersections (George Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein). Her current research focuses on Broadway musicals of the 1940s and on the racial desegregation of performance. In 2013-14, she is Leonard Bernstein Scholar-in-Residence with the New York Philharmonic.

Oja faculty page


 

 

 

 

rehding

Alexander Rehding
Fanny Peabody Professor of Music; Chair
Theory
arehding[at]fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 305 N (Professorial: 496-6646)
Music Building 104 S (Chair's office: 617-495-9854 )
Department Reception: 617-495-2791

Rehding's research interests are located at the intersection between theory and history, and cover a wide spectrum from Ancient Greek music to the Eurovision Song Contest. Rehding is interested in the history of music theory, paleo- and neo-Riemannian theory, music-aesthetic questions, and issues of sound and media.

Rehding faculty page




 

 

 

srevuluri

Sindhumathi Revuluri
Associate Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
revuluri@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 302 S
617-496-9317

Revuluri's research interests include 19th and 20th century France (especially modernism and exoticism), global pop music, film and media studies, and critical and postcolonial theory.

Revuluri faculty page




 

 

 

Kay Kaufman Shelemay
G. Gordon Watts Professor of Music
Professor of African and African American Studies
Ethnomusicology
shelemay@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 7
617-495-4008

In addition to longtime interests in musical ethnography and music and memory, Shelemay's current research is on Ethiopian music and musicians in their North American diaspora.

Shelemay faculty page




 

 

 

Anne C. Shreffler
James Edward Ditson Professor of Music
Affiliate, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Historical Musicology
acshreff@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 301S
617-494-7742

Anne C. Shreffler’s research interests include the musical avant-garde after 1945 in Europe and America, with special emphasis on the political and ideological associations of new music.Other research interests include historiography, composers in emigration, performance theory, and contemporary opera.

Shreffler faculty page





 

 

 

Daniel Stepner
Preceptor in Music
Performance: Chamber Music
stepner@brandeis.edu
Music Building 1
617-495-2791

Daniel Stepner is first violinist for the Lydian String Quartet (in residence at Brandeis University), and Artistic Director of the Aston Magna Festival. He was a founding member of the Boston Museum Trio (resident at the Museum of Fine Arts for 35 years) and Concertmaster of the Handel and Haydn Society for 24 years). He is well-known for his versatility in Baroque and modern violin. He has made over 60 recordings of music from Monteverdi to Harbison. Recent recordings (on Centaur) include the Late Quartets of Beethoven, the Sonatas and Partitas of J. S. Bach, and a recording of 20th-century works for solo violin.

Stepner faculty page


danielstepner.com



 

 

 

Hans Tutschku (on leave 2013-14)
Fanny P. Mason Professor of Music, Director of the Harvard University Studio for Electroacoustic Composition (HUSEAC)
Composition
tutschku@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building G-3
617-495-2314

http://www.tutschku.com

Tutschku has composed music for film, theatre, and ballet as well as instrumental and electroacoustic music. He has also conceived several sound installations and published articles on sound diffusion. A main focus of Tutschku's work is improvisation with live-electronics, and he tours regularly with his Ensemble für Intuitive Musik Weimar.

Professor Tutschku is a Radcliffe Fellow for the year 2013-2014.

Tutschku faculty page




 

 

 

Kate van Orden
Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
vanorden@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building 204 S
495-3198

Professor van Orden specializes in the cultural history of early modern France and Italy. Her current publications investigate music and the cultures of print and include Music, Authorship, and the Book in the First Century of Print (2013) and the forthcoming Materialities: Books, Readers, and the Chanson in 16th-c. Europe. Thanks to generous research grants from the ACLS and Delmas Foundation, her new cross-cultural project examines French music, migration, and the performance of ethnic identity in Cinquecento Italy. Before taking a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1996, van Orden began her career in Europe, where she studied historical performance practice. She performs and records regularly on early bassoons and makes a point of working at history through performance.

van Orden faculty page


   
 

 

 

rwolf

Richard Wolf
Professor of Music
Ethnomusicology
rwolf@fas.harvard.edu
031 Memorial Hall (office location only/mailing address is Music Building)
Postal address: Music Building / Harvard University / Cambridge, MA 02138
617-494-7678

Wolf's thematic interests include emotional complexity in ceremonial contexts, the constitutive properties of musical action in rituals, the poetics of non-verbal activities, the musical qualities of languages and the analytic potentials of particular languages for the study of music. He writes on issues of music and Islam in south Asia, and on south Indian folk and tribal music.

Wolf faculty page


 

   



Visiting Faculty/Instructors
2013-14

 

 

 




Richard Burkhardt, Lecturer on Music (spring 2014)

will be teaching a graduate composition seminar in the spring of 2014. He studied music composition at Harvard University, the University of Illinois, and the University of California, San Diego, where he earned his Ph.D. in 2006. Burkhardt has received commissions, grants, and performances from organizations and performers such as the U.S.-Mexico Fund for Culture, the La Jolla Symphony, Ensemble Surplus, the Boswil Foundation, János Négyesy and Päivikki Nykter, Ensemble Ascolta, Red Fish Blue Fish, the NOISE quartet, the past(modern) duo, sfSound, Toca Loca, Mark Menzies, the Olympia Chamber Orchestra, the American Composers Forum, and Ensemble Chronophonie.

He is a founding member of the Nonsense Company, an experimental music / theater trio dedicated to new works and new venues. The Nonsense Company has performed in over 30 US cities, presenting new music and theater in unexpected combinations for a wide range of audiences. Their concert in Darmstadt in 2004 was hailed as "one of the most solid, free, and critical aesthetic propositions... of the festival."
Along with Alec Duffy, Dave Malloy, and Rachel Chavkin, he received an Obie Award for creating the play "Three Pianos" at the Ontological-Hysteric Theater in 2010.


 


 

Scott Edwards, Harvard College Fellow

Edwards will be teaching Music 1a and 1b as well as a proseminar on comedy in early modern music. Scott recently completed a PhD at UC Berkeley writing on renaissance music in Bohemia/Moravia.




Photo: Lydia Rilling

Aaron Einbond, Lecturer on Music (spring 2014)

Einbond will be teaching two electronic music seminars; one for concentrators and one for graduate students. His work explores the intersection of composition, computer music, music perception, field recording, and sound installation. He was born in New York in 1978 and has studied at Harvard, the University of Cambridge, the University of California Berkeley, and IRCAM in Paris with teachers including Mario Davidovsky, Julian Anderson, Edmund Campion, and Philippe Leroux. From 2009–2011, he was Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Music at Columbia University and he is currently Research Fellow at the Centre for Research in New Music at the University of Huddersfield. Upcoming projects include a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship and a Giga-Hertz Prize from ZKM to produce a new work at the SWR Experimentalstudio in Freiburg.


 

Daniel Henderson, Lecturer on Music

Daniel Henderson teaches "Jazz Harmony" and "Jazz Improvisation" in the Department of Music, where he has been awarded the Harvard University Certificate of Teaching Excellence three times. He has taught in the Musicology, Music Theory, and Jazz Studies Departments at New England Conservatory, and directed numerous jazz ensembles. He holds DMA and MM degrees in Jazz Composition with Academic Honors from New England Conservatory, where he was awarded the 2011 Gunther Schuller Medal.

Daniel studies the music of a variety of jazz composers, including Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk, and his early mentor, Billy May. Two current projects include the development of a new analytical and pedagogical approach to the way jazz improvisers “jazz up” the melodies of popular songs, and a study of children’s albums produced by Capitol Records in the 1940s and 50s. Daniel is a trumpeter, vocalist, composer, and arranger whose music has been heard worldwide as a member of The New Hot 5, a New Orleans-style jazz band that accidentally became famous for their Youtube video, “Jazz for Cows,” which has been featured on Conan O’Brien, Good Morning America, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and on television stations worldwide.


 

 

Evan Johnson, Lecturer on Music (fall 2013)

Johnson will teach Music 105r, improvisation and composition, as well as a graduate seminar in composition. His music focuses on the physical underpinnings of instrumental performance, extreme notational situations, and the structural potential of conflicting repetitive and canonic structures. His music has been performed throughout North America, Europe and beyond by many prominent ensembles and soloists, and programmed at American and international festivals of contemporary music at Darmstadt, Witten, Huddersfield, Leuven (TRANSIT), Berlin (Klangwerkstatt), Bludenz, Los Angeles (the Monday Evening Concerts series), Buffalo, San Diego, and others. Recordings are available or forthcoming on the HCR, Metier, Mode, and New Focus labels.

The recipient of a Fellowship Prize at the 2012 Darmstadt Summer Courses and a 2011 Meet the Composer commission, Johnson has received commissions and awards from BMI/Concert Artists Guild, ASCAP, Columbia University (Bearns Prize), the Rhode Island Foundation, the Rhode Island State Council for the Arts, the Society for New Music, and Yale University, among others. He has held residencies at Copland House and the Millay Colony. Johnson received his Ph.D. in composition from the State University of New York at Buffalo, where he studied with David Felder as a Presidential Fellow, and his B.A. from Yale.






Peter Kaminsky, Visiting Professor (University of Connecticut) (fall 2013)

Peter Kaminsky earned his doctor of philosophy and master of arts degrees in music theory from the Eastman School of Music and a bachelor's degree in music education, with a concentration in piano, from Boston University. He taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and at Louisiana State University before joining the University of Connecticut faculty in 1993. His research interests include the music of Ravel, text-music relationships, popular music, structural principles in cyclic works, and, recently, performance and analysis and its pedagogy. He has published articles and reviews in Music Theory Spectrum, Music Analysis, Theoria, College Music Symposium, Music Theory Online, Theory and Practice, The Cambridge Companion to Ravel, and the Zeitschrift der Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie. Kaminsky is editor and contributor to Unmasking Ravel: New Perspectives on the Music (forthcoming, University of Rochester Press). He has been an invited lecturer at Penn State, Boston, Yale, and Wesleyan universities, Hartt Conservatory, and the University of Texas at Austin. He has served the Society for Music Theory as a member-at-large of the Executive Board (2005–6), as a member of the Graduate Workshop Program Subcommittee (2006), and as a member and chair of the Program Committee (2006–7). With Janet Schmalfeldt, Kaminsky was co-leader of the Graduate Student Workshop in Performance and Analysis at the 2008 meeting of the New England Conference of Music Theorists, which he serves as president.

He will teach a graduate seminar in Ravel at Harvard.


 


Associates of the Department 2013-14


Associates, Visiting Scholars, Fellows, and Artists-in-Residence

Betsey Biggs, post-doc Fellow
Noel Bisson Harvard University
Donald Braden, Interim Conductor, Monday Jazz Band
Phoebe Carrai, Harvard Baroque Chamber Orchestra
Hsuan Chang, Visiting Fellow
Jody Diamond, Artist-in-Residence, Gamelan Music Studio
Emily Dolan, visiting Scholar
Shadi Ebrahimi, Associate
Judith Eissenberg, Fellow
Tom Everett, Associate
Edward Jones, Gund University Organist and Choirmaster
Sirojiddin Juraev, Associate
Christian Lane, Assistant Organist and Choirmaster
Terry Russ Manitt, Visiting post-doc
Blanka Maderova, Fellow
Misako Ohta, Visiting Scholar
Mark Olson, Interim Director of the Harvard Bands
Tiagode Oliveria Pinto, Visiting Scholar
Mehmet Ali Sanlikol, Visiting Scholar - Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Jonathan Sterne, Visiting Scholar -McGill University (spring)
Steven Takasugi, Associate
Silk Road Project
Packard Humanities CPE Bach Project
Chiara String Quartet, Blodgett Artists-in-Residence



 
Emeriti
In Memorium
Leon Kirchner
Reinhold Brinkmann
James Yannatos
John Milton Ward
 

 

 

Mario Davidovsky
Professor Emeritus
Composition


Directed the Columbia/Princeton Electronic Music Center for many years while he was MacDowell Professor of Music at Columbia University. He also served as Director of the Composers' Conference at Wellesley for 29 years. Professor Davidovsky received the Walter Channing Cabot Fellowship. In 2000-2001, two CDs of his works were recently released by Bridge Records: Flashback and Canticum Cantorum; and his Cantione Sine Textu, for soprano and chamber ensemble, was published by C.F. Peters. Davidovsky served as vice-president of the Koussevitzky Foundation at the Library of Congress; vice-president of the Robert Miller Fund for Music, and consulted for the Guggenheim Foundation both in the U.S. and Latin America. He is Director of the Harvard University Studio for Electroacoustic Composition.
 

 

 

David G. Hughes
Professor Emeritus
Historical Musicology


Prof. Hughes was educated at Harvard (A.B., M.A. and Ph.D.), with a dissertation on line and counterpoint in Gothic music. He studied theory and composition with Irving Fine, Randall Thompson and Walter Piston, and musicology with A. Tillman Merritt, Stephen Tuttle and Otto Gombosi. Hughes taught at Harvard as Fanny P. Mason Professor of Music from 1964 until his retirement in 1994. He worked primarily in the areas of Gregorian and post-Gregorian chant, liturgical music and medieval polyphony, notation and modal theory. He co-compiled the Index of Gregorian Chant, and was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Musicological Society (1959-63). Hughes published many articles and was honored with a Festschrift on his 70th birthday, Essays on Medieval Music in Honor of David Hughes (1995).
 

 

 

Lewis Lockwood
Fanny Peabody Research Professor of Music
Historical Musicology
llockw@fas.harvard.edu
710 Widener Library
617-495-7574

Lewis Lockwood's recent book, Beethoven: The Music and the Life (New York: W.W. Norton, 2003) was a finalist for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize in biography. Lockwood took the B.A. at Queens College, New York, studying with Edward Lowinsky, and did his graduate work at Princeton with OIiver Strunk and Arthur Mendel. He taught at Princeton from 1958 to 1980, when he came to Harvard, where he was named Fanny Peabody Professor of Music in 1985. He was President of the American Musicological Society in 1987-88 and was named an Honorary Member of the AMS in 1993. His scholarly work has focused on music in the Italian Renaissance and on Beethoven and his era. In 1997 he was presented with a volume entitled Music in Renaissance Cities and Courts: Studies in Honor of Lewis Lockwood, edited by Jessie Ann Owens and Anthony Cummings (Detroit, 1997). He won the Einstein and Kinkeldey awards of the AMS, and an ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award for his book, Beethoven: Studies in the Creative Process (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992). In 2005 the American Musicological Society established an annual award in his name for the best book by a younger scholar.
 

 

 

Jameson Marvin
Choral Director

Website: www.jamesonmarvin.com

Dr. Marvin received a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Illinois, a Master of Arts in Choral Conducting from Stanford University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Music Composition from the UCSB. He was Director of Choral Ensembles at Vassar College before coming here in 1978. Dr. Marvin conducts the Harvard Glee Club, Radcliffe Choral Society, and the Harvard-Radcliffe Collegium Musicum, and offers courses in Choral Conducting and Choral Analysis/Interpretation. He has conducted 80 choral-orchestral works and is a conductor, teacher, author, scholar, editor and arranger. Dr. Marvin has written on subjects ranging from choral intonation to Renaissance music for men's voices including The Conductor's Process, Five Centuries of Choral Music: Essays in Honor of Howard Swan, Pengragon Press, Mastery of Choral Ensemble, E. C. Schirmer, Choral Excellence: Elements of Successful Leadership, and Perfection and Naturalness: A Practical Guide to Renaissance Choral Performance, Oxford University Press. Dr. Marvin has sustained and expanded a choral environment rich enought to attract thousands of students to his program, from the beginning singer to the advanced musician. The choral program at Harvard was named the top collegiate choral program in the country by Classical Singer magazine.

 

 

 

Rulan Pian
Professor Emerita
East Asian Studies, Ethnomusicology


Prof. Pian was educated at Radcliffe and studied Western music history and theory with Tillman Merritt (B.A. and M.A.). She received her Ph.D. from Harvard with a dissertation on the Song dynasty. She join the Harvard music department, teaching Chinese music, in 1961, and was made a professor of east Asian languages and civilizations and professor of music in 1974. Pian was appointed fellow of the Academica Sinaica in Taiwan in 1994. She has published widely on Song dynasty, musical sources, Peking opera, Peking drum songs and other historical and contemporary genres. Since the late 1970s, she has travelled to China regularly, bringing the latest Western ideas there, and returning to America with a wealth of fieldwork data and audio-visual recordings, materials that preserve and illustrate Chinese music to American audiences.

 

 

 

John Stewart
Musicianship

Stewart holds a Ed.D. from Harvard and a B.M. from the New England Conservatory of Music. He founded and directed the Young Musician's Program of the Ernest Bloch Music Festival in Newport, Oregon, where he also premiered his work, Threnody (Chorale Partita), Luise Vosgerchian In Memoriam. His Ives Fantasy Suite received its Boston premiere at The New England Conservatory.

 

 

 



Bernard Rands
Research Professor
Composition
amc65aum@aol.com

Rands taught at several universities in the U.K., and at U.C. San Diego and Boston University in the U.S. before coming to Harvard in 1989. He's won a Pulitzer, and has had works commissioned by the New York Philharmonic for their 150th Anniversary and Carnegie Hall for their 100th Anniversary.

Bernard Rands website
cwolff

 

Christoph Wolff
Adams University Research Professor
Curator of the Isham Memorial Library
Historical Musicology
cwolff@fas.harvard.edu
Paine Hall 1
617-495-2791

Wolff's primary research interests extend to the music from the 17th to the early 19th century, especially to Bach and Mozart studies.

Wolff faculty page

Mozart at the Gateway to his Fortune. Music Facsimilies and Recordings




 

 

 

 

 

 

Staff  

Nancy Shafman, Director of Administration
Lesley Bannatyne, Managing Communications Coordinator
Kaye Denny, Front Office Co-Manager
Alison Hearn, Staff Assistant
Eva Kim, Assistant to the Chair
Jean Moncrieff, Director of Events
Abby Rahn, Undergraduate Coordinator and Events Assistant
Karen Rynne, Manager of Administration and Finance
Charles Stillman, Front Office Co-Manager
Seth Torres, HUSEAC Technical Director
Fernando Viesca, Building Manager

Affiliated Staff
Piano Technical Services

Lesley Bannatyne, Managing Communications Coordinator
bannatyn@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, 102S
617-495-2791
Lesley oversees website maintenance, publicity, department directories, scholarly publications, the newsletter,
and other special projects. She also meets with and dispenses information to prospective students.

Kaye Denny, Front Office Co-Manager
denny2@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, Reception
617-495-2791
Kaye is reponsible for room reservations, mail operations, practice rooms and all reception duties.

Alison Hearn, Staff Assistant
hearn@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, 101S
617-495-2791
Alison assists the Financial Manager and works on special projects.

Eva Kim, Assistant to the Chair
evakim@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, 104S
617-495-2791
Eva assists faculty, organizes the University Hall Recitals, schedules meetings for the Chair, coordinates committees and maintains department data.

Jean Moncrieff, Director of Events
moncrief@fas.harvard.edu
Paine Hall 4
617-495-9859
Jean books Paine Concert Hall and produces the department's concerts, lectures and conferences.
She also administers the Fromm Foundation at Harvard.

Abby Rahn, Undergraduate and Events Coordinator
Abby monitors and advises students and faculty on the progress of concentrators, joint or secondary concentrators, and students enrolled in the New England Conservatory/Harvard program. She also assists the Director of Events with concerts and other activities held in Paine Hall.

Karen Rynne,
Manager of Administration and Finance
rynne@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, 101S
617-496-3253
Karen handles all department billing and payments, and manages financial accounts and
services the copiers.

Nancy Shafman, Director of Administration
nshafman@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, 103S
617-495-9855
Nancy coordinates the academic programs for the department and works closely with the chair and faculty. She supervises the department and is knowledgable about teaching requirements, exams, fellowships, financial aid, and the philosophy and organization of the department.

Charles Stillman, Front Office Co-Manager
stillman@fas.harvard.edu
Music Building, Reception
617-495-2791
Charles is reponsible for room reservations, mail operations, practice rooms and all reception duties.

Seth Torres, HUSEAC Technical Director
storres@fas.harvard.edu
Paine Hall 21
617-496-6683
Seth maintains and manages the electronic music studio and assists Hans Tutschku, studio director.

Fernando Viesca, Building Manager
fviesca@fas.harvard.edu
Paine Hall 10
617-495-9851
Fernando manages all things having to do with the physical plant: electrical and internet connections, telephones, computers, heat, and air conditioning, plumbing and all special construction projects.

   

c 2013 President and Fellows of Harvard College